Dr. Sean Valentine will be presenting at the Midwest Academy of Management Conference

Sean Valentine

Dr. Sean Valentine will be presenting his research “Having and Communicating Ethics Codes to Enhance Manager and Employee Ethics: A Study of Hospitality and Recreation Organizations in Nigeria” and “Workplace Bullying, Socially-Averse Attitudes, Reduced Work Group Effectiveness, and Organizational Frustration” at The Midwest Academy of Management Conference on October 10 – October 12, 2019 in Omaha, Nebraska.

Authors on the paper included Sean Valentine and Lynn Godkin.

Paper Abstract: Having and Communicating Ethics Codes to Enhance Manager and Employee Ethics: A Study of Hospitality and Recreation Organizations in Nigeria

Since ethics codes can be used in developing nations to facilitate corporate ethics, social responsibility, and governance, this study investigates whether having and communicating ethics codes in Nigerian hospitality and recreation organizations results in stronger beliefs among employees that their managers are ethical. Such beliefs should also encourage stronger perceptions of ethical issue importance in an ethical scenario, a critical component of ethical decision making. In addition, having and communicating ethics codes should result in stronger perceived ethical issue importance. The findings indicated that having and communicating an ethics code were associated with a stronger belief that an employee’s manager was ethical, and that such a belief was associated with stronger ethical issue importance. Both having and communicating an ethics code were indirectly and positively related to ethical issue importance by functioning through manager ethics, highlighting full mediation. The practical implications for developing managerial and employee ethics in hospitality firms are discussed, and the research limitations and suggestions are outlined.

Authors on the paper included Sean Valentine, Robert Giacalone, and Gary Fleischman.

Paper Abstract: Workplace Bullying, Socially-Averse Attitudes, Reduced Work Group Effectiveness, and Organizational Frustration

Workplace bullying can harm employees’ attitudes and dispositions and encourage reactionary misbehaviors and frustration. This study investigates key underexplored responses to such bullying, including individual distrust of others, political job beliefs, work group cohesion and communication, and organizational frustration. Data were collected from research panelists at two points in time, providing a time-lagged analysis of the proposed relationships. The results supported all but one of the hypotheses presented, indicating that workplace bullying can lead to pervasively negative attitudes, dispositions, and experiences in the workplace. The managerial and research implications of these findings are highlighted, along with the limitations and suggestions for future research

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