Don Warne to present lead talk in UND Faculty Lecture Series Sept. 25

Donald Warne, MD, MPH, director of the SMHS Indians Into Medicine and Master of Public Health programs, and associate dean for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, will be the lead speaker in UND’s 2019-20 Faculty Lecture Series. The talk will be held at 4:30 p.m. in Room 7 of the Education building on the UND campus on Sept. 25, and will be preceded by a 4 p.m. reception.

The presentation, titled “American Indian Health Equity: Trauma, Resilience, and Recovery,” is free and open to the public.

The State of North Dakota’s Recovery Reinvented program, led by First Lady Kathryn Helgaas Burgum, who will be in attendance, will also be discussed. Recovery Reinvented focuses on proven approaches to address addiction and recovery without shame or stigma. The talk will also put forth a research and educational agenda for UND and partner institutions to focus on recovery and to eliminate health inequities for future generations.

As Dr. Warne puts it in his presentation abstract, “The American Indian (AI) population suffers from significant health disparities, and the outcomes in the Northern Plains, including North Dakota, are among the worst in the nation. Numerous factors contribute to health inequities, including poverty, inadequate educational systems, food deserts, marginalization, and other social determinants of health. An additional consideration that contributes to poor health outcomes for the AI population is unresolved trauma in the forms of historical trauma, Boarding School participation, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), and discrimination. In this lecture we will focus on research into historical trauma and ACEs in North Dakota and South Dakota. We will discuss the concepts of resilience and recovery to prevent future trauma and to mitigate the impact and outcomes of trauma, including poor mental health, suicide, addiction, and chronic disease.”

An enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota Tribe in Pine Ridge, S.D., Warne received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the Stanford University School of Medicine in 1995 and his Master of Public Health degree from Harvard University in 2002. A prolific scholar and grant writer, Warne is also senior policy advisor for the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board and former senior fellow of American Indian health policy for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico.

In addition to being a member of the American Public Health Association, American Medical Association, and Association of American Indian Physicians, Warne served in a leadership capacity for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the American Cancer Society.