Christensen Publishes Law Review Article On Reading Indian Law and Presents on Corporate Law at the University of Oslo

grant-christensen-170Arizona Law Review Article: UND Professor Grant Christensen, and Melissa Tatum from the University of Arizona, have just posted their most recent legal scholarship. “Reading Indian Law” will be published later this year by the University of Tulsa Law Review and reflects the growing trend in legal scholarship to incorporate an empirical component into a traditionally qualitative discipline. Cribbing from the Abstract: “This article surveys thirty years of law review articles and compiles a formal ranking system to create a list of the 100 most influential Indian law scholarly pieces from the last thirty years. As Indian law has grown from a niche field offered by a couple schools to a robust legal discipline it is now impossible for the thousands of professors, students, practitioners, and judges to identify the most important pieces published each year. This piece, with its first of its kind approach to ranking Indian law scholarship, has the potential to not only highlight other important works but to become an article that is itself the focus of conversation.”  

The article can be downloaded here: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3142056  

In addition to support from the University of North Dakota, Professor Christensen would like to thank the Webb family for their support of his scholarship this year. The Webb Professorship honors the late Judge Rodney Webb and supports innovative legal scholarship at the University of North Dakota.

Oslo Presentation: Professor Grant Christensen was an invited speaker at the University of Oslo as part of a three-day international conference focused on Corporate Law, Corporate Governance, and Sustainability. The event brought together legal scholars from around the world to discuss the challenges of promoting sustainability in a world governed by corporate rules that too often emphasize short term shareholder value over long term sustainability which has the potential to maintain shareholder value through periods of social, environmental, and cultural change. The speakers at the conference have each also produced a chapter summarizing their presentation to be collected and published by Cambridge University Press.

Professor Christensen focused his contributions on bringing an indigenous perspective to questions of sustainability. His scholarship emphasized that the concept of sustainability must include the promotion of social equality and cultural equity. From an indigenous perspective this includes ensuring the protection of sacred sites, the preservation of indigenous language and culture, and the respect of chthonic law (legal principles that come from indigenous legal traditions). His presentation also emphasized examples of how corporate – indigenous partnerships have produced great returns for both indigenous communities and for corporate shareholders, and contrasted such positive relationships with the cost to corporations of protracted conflict with native peoples.

In addition to support from both the University of North Dakota and the University of Oslo, Professor Christensen would like to thank the Webb family for their support of his scholarship this year. The Webb Professorship honors the late Judge Rodney Webb and supports innovative legal scholarship at the University of North Dakota.