UND Summer Undergraduate Students Present Research

2014 Summer Undergraduate Research Poster Session 057--E-NewsFifty undergraduates present the results of their labors this summer at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research Experience poster session from 9:00 a.m. to noon on Thursday, August 4, on the second floor of the new School of Medicine & Health Sciences building at 1301 North Columbia Road. For the past ten weeks, students from UND, as well as from rural and tribal colleges in Minnesota, North Dakota, and across the nation have conducted research and participated in a number of related educational opportunities. Students participated, shoulder-to-shoulder, with their mentor scientists from the UND Department of Biology, the UND Department of Civil Engineering, the UND SMHS Departments of Pathology and Biomedical Sciences, Cankdeska Cikana Community College, and the UND SMHS Center for Rural Health. Read more

National Institutes of Health Funds UND Scientist’s Lyme Disease Research

Lyme disease, caused by a spiral-shaped bacterium known as Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), is the cause of more than 90 percent of all arthropod-borne diseases affecting humans in the United States. Arthropods are a group of animals that includes lobsters, crabs, ticks, spiders, mites, insects, centipedes, and millipedes. Estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggest that 300,000 people each year are affected by Lyme disease. Total direct medical costs of Lyme disease and post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS) in the United States are estimated at $1.3 billion per year.brissette-catherine-hs

“Controlled trials of long-term antibiotic treatment for post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms have failed to show benefits,” said Catherine Brissette, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine & Health Sciences. “If active infection is not responsible, what causes the persistent, lingering symptoms in patients treated with long-term antibiotics? Our data suggest Bb is a ‘hit and run’ pathogen, and the presence of live bacteria is not required to drive persistent inflammation.” Read more

Jondle Receives Competitive American Association of Immunologists (AAI) Fellowship

sharma-and-jondle-hsChristopher Jondle, a graduate student mentored by Assistant Professor Jyotika Sharma, PhD, in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, has been selected for the prestigious 2016 American Association of Immunologists (AAI) Careers in Immunology Fellowship.

The AAI Careers in Immunology Fellowship Program supports the career development of young scientists by providing eligible principal investigators with one year of salary support for a trainee in their labs.

“This is truly a testament to our students’ capability of competing at the national level with the very best and succeeding,” Sharma said. “I am very proud of Chris.”
~ Med School E-News, 6/10/2016

Scott Bultman will Present Epigenetics Seminar May 19, 2016

Scott Bultman, PhD, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine Department of Genetics, will present his seminar titled “A gut microbiome metabolite regulates histone acetylation by dual mechanisms that are differentially utilized by normal versus cancer cells due to the Warburg effect” at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 19, in the Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, at the SMHS in Grand Forks. Read more

May 19 Seminar Focuses on Histone Acetylation

Scott Bultman, Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will present a seminar titled “A gut microbiome metabolite regulates histone acetylation by dual mechanisms that are differentially utilized by normal versus cancer cells due to the Warburg effect”  at 4:00 p.m. Thursday, May 19, in Clifford Haugen Room 1360; School of Medicine & Health Sciences.

This seminar is co-sponsored by the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) for Epigenomics and the Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine & Health Sciences.

All are welcome.

~ University Letter, 5/10/2016

Atrayee Bhattacharya Wins Denison Award

Atrayee Bhattacharya, a second-year graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, won a Denison Award for best graduate student talk at the 108th Annual Meeting of the North Dakota Academy of Science at North Dakota State University in Fargo. Bhattacharya shared first place with co-winner Nilushni Sivapragasam from North Dakota State University.

The title of Bhattacharya’s talk was “The Role of CCCTC Binding Factor (CTCF) in Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT).”
bhattacharya-atrayee-hs-2Bhattacharya works in the laboratory of Assistant Professor Archana Dhasarathy, PhD. Read more

Jianguo Gu to Speak at the Department of Biomedical Sciences Seminar on April 21, 2016

Jianguo G. Gu, MB, PhD, will be speaking at the Department of Biomedical Sciences Seminar at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 21, 2016 in the Clifford Haugen Lecture Hall, Room 1360, at the School of Medicine & Health Sciences in Grand Forks. The title of his talk is “Tactile Transduction and Transmission in Mammals.”

Gu is the the Edward A. Ernst, MD, Endowed Professor in the University of Alabama Birmingham Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine. Read more

Geiger Elected President of Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology

Jonathan D. Geiger, PhD, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the UND School of Medicine & Health Sciences, has been elected to serve as president of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology (SNIP). Last year, Dr. Geiger received the society’s top award, the Joseph Wybran Award, for extraordinary contributions to the advancement of the fields of neuroimmunology, drugs of abuse, and immunity to infections. On April 6-9, the international society will hold its annual meeting in Krakow, Poland, where his election will be formally recognized. Read more

Jondle to Present at Annual Meeting of the American Association of Immunologists

Christopher Jondle, a graduate student mentored by Assistant Professor Jyotika Sharma, PhD, in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, had his abstract accepted for an oral presentation at Immunology 2016, the annual meeting of the American Association of Immunologists (AAI) to be held in Seattle in May. The AAI will provide partial support for his travel to the meeting.
sharma-and-jondle-hsThe title of his abstract is “Impact of Klebsiella pneumoniae on efferocytosis of polymorphonuclear cells.” Klebsiella is a type of bacteria that can cause different types of infections, including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, wound or surgical site infections, and meningitis. Jondle’s research looks at how Klebsiella affects the ability of polymorphonuclear cells (the main cells involved in the body’s immune reaction) to ingest and remove dead cells from the bloodstream. Read more