Melissa Wheeler receives award for contributions to Native and Indigenous Psychology

Melissa Wheeler
Melissa Wheeler

Melissa Wheeler recently received the American Psychological Association Division 45 The Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race, Joseph E. Trimble Outstanding Student in Native/Indigenous Psychology Award at the annual APA Convention held in Washington, D.C. The award honors outstanding American Indian graduate students who have made significant contributions toward making psychology responsive and relevant to the needs of Native and indigenous communities.

Wheeler received the recognition in part for her research contributions and passion in helping mend the psychological and health disparities in Native populations.

Wheeler is a research specialist for the National Indigenous Elder Justice Initiative Innovation program at the Center for Rural Health at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Grand Forks. She received her Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in Addictions at UND. Wheeler is from Round Rock, Arizona and a member of the Navajo Nation.

Wheeler co-authored an article in the Journal of Community Psychology titled “Assessment of Risk and Protection in Native American Youth: Steps Toward Conducting Culturally Relevant, Sustainable Prevention in Indian Country.” She is a member of the National Association for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (NAADAC) and the American Psychological Association. She is also a past fellow of the NAADAC Minority Fellowship Program for Addiction Counselors.

The Joseph E. Trimble Outstanding Student in Native/Indigenous Psychology Award was created in honor of Joseph E. Trimble’s contributions to making Native and Indigenous psychology responsive and relevant to the needs of Native and Indigenous communities.