Sept. 20: UND Constitution Day celebration features investigative journalist Eric Schlosser

Eric Schlosser. Photo by Kodiak Greenwood
Eric Schlosser. Photo by Kodiak Greenwood

Investigative journalist Eric Schlosser will be the featured speaker for the celebration of Constitution Day at UND on Sept. 20. The UND School of Law, in partnership with the North Dakota Humanities Council, will host a discussion with Schlosser titled “And Justice For All” at 5:30 p.m. in the law school’s Baker Courtroom. A social with Schlosser will precede the discussion beginning at 4:30 p.m. in the Law School Central Commons.  The event is free and open to the public.

Eric Schlosser’s upcoming book, The Great Imprisonment (2018), will describe how the United States came to have the largest prison system in the history of humankind—and how that system affects every one of us. During this candid, sit-down interview with Martin Gottschalk, Associate Professor and Chair of UND’s Criminal Justice Department, Schlosser will discuss his current research, including how the three-fifths clause in the Constitution helped pave the way for the United States to become home to almost twenty-five percent of the world’s modern-day prison population.

Seating is limited, so register today at http://www.gamechangernd.com/greatimprisonment.html

The program will be live streamed if you are not able to attend in person. A link for the stream will be added to the UND School of Law website http://law.und.edu/features/2017/09/schlosser.cfm near the date of the event, and it will be covered on the UND Law School Facebook page. The program has been approved for one credit of North Dakota CLE and one credit of North Dakota CJE.

This event is part of the GameChanger Ideas Festival. The North Dakota Humanities Council created GameChanger, an annual ideas festival focused on a major event or issue significantly changing the face of our world. See www.gamechangernd.com for more details.

The annual Constitution Day celebration recognizes the ratification of the United States Constitution and those who have become U.S. citizens. It generally is observed on Sept. 17, the day the U.S. Constitutional Convention signed the Constitution in 1787. This year, Constitution Day will be observed on Sept. 20 to allow programming on a weekday. The 2004 law establishing the holiday was part of a congressional bill mandating that all publicly funded educational institutions provide educational programming on the history of the American Constitution on that day.