‘Time-Out’ for Wacipi

UND’s annual Time-Out Week, which runs April 18-20, features educational programming, focusing this year on the theme of ‘Resilience’

Time-Out Week and Wacipi

The Time-Out Week and Wacipi is a two-part effort of the UND Indian Association and the Indian Studies Association. The Time-Out Week, which will run April 18-20, features educational programming, focusing this year on the theme of “Resilience.” Admission to the Wacipi is $8 per day or $14 for the weekend; admission is free to children 5 and under, seniors 60 and older, and UND students (must show current student ID). Wristbands must be worn at all times. UND archival photo.

The Time-Out Week and the Time-Out Wacipi, one of the longest-running cultural events at the University of North Dakota, is set for Tuesday through Sunday, April 18-23.

This celebration and exploration of American Indian life and issues is in its 47th consecutive year.

The Time-Out Week and Wacipi is a two-part effort of the UND Indian Association (UNDIA) and the Indian Studies Association (ISA). The Time-Out Week, which will run April 18-20, features educational programming, focusing this year on the theme of “Resilience.”

“We chose the theme ‘Resilience’ to show that we are still here,” said Gavin Nadeau, UNDIA president. “We are in a constant battle with issues regarding the environment, violence against women, and cultural awareness. Resilience means that we are not giving up. As college students, we have found our own way of resilience through our pursuit of higher education. We use higher education as a tool against the dangers to the land, women, and culture. We, ISA, hope that we can give our fellow students some insight into the world of Native American resilience.”

 

Powwow hosts thousands

The Wacipi, or powwow, celebrates American Indian life through food, friendship, drums, singing and dance. The contest portion of the event, with its strong rhythms and the dancers’ spectacular outfits and energy, is a highlight of cultural life in Greater Grand Forks. The event runs April 21-23 in the Hyslop Sports Center.

annual Wacapi, powwow

American Indian women elders converse and enjoy the pageantry of UND’s annual Wacipi celebration. The first Wacipi on campus was held in November 1968, following the organization of the University of North Dakota Indian Association. The first Time-Out was held the following year. The first Wacipi on campus was held in November 1968, following the organization of the University of North Dakota Indian Association. The first Time-Out was held the following year. UND archival photo.

The first Wacipi on campus was held in November 1968, following the organization of the University of North Dakota Indian Association. The first Time-Out was held the following year.

Through the years, the Time-Out Week and Time-Out Wacipi have featured programming on a wide range of American Indian issues and activities such as workshops, art exhibitions, displays, crafts, runs and basketball tournaments, and entertainment.

Just some of the notables who have participated in past programs include singer-composer Buffy Sainte-Marie, Olympic gold medalist Billy Mills, actor and artist Will Sampson Jr. (“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “The Outlaw Josey Wales”), activists Russell Means and Vernon Bellecourt, and John Herrington, the first American Indian astronaut.

“This event recognizes the largest under-represented population in North Dakota: the American Indian,” said Leigh Jeanotte, UND’s director of American Indian Student Services. “The Time-Out Week and Wacipi powwow educate the campus, Grand Forks, and surrounding communities about American Indian cultural values, heritage and traditions. The event draws thousands of spectators, and includes over 500 dancers and more than 20 drum groups from across the United States and Canada. This weeklong event greatly impacts the city of Grand Forks economically, as most participants travel here from across the region and patronize local businesses.”

IF YOU GO:

Events for the 2017 Time-Out will be held in the Memorial Union, unless otherwise indicated. The schedule is:

Tuesday, April 18:  “Environmental Sustainability”

11 a.m. — Opening ceremony (Badlands Room)

Noon — “Communicating Environmental Science in a New Media Era,” Sand-Bagger News Affiliates (Lecture Bowl)

2 p.m. — “Resistance, Resilience and Reconciliation: Indigenous Environmental Justice,” Dave Archambault, Chair, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and Dean DePountis, attorney for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (Baker Courtroom, School of Law)

5 p.m. — “Renewable Energy: A New Way to Honor the Old Ways,” Henry Red Cloud, CEO, Lakota Solar Enterprises (Badlands Room)

Wednesday, April 19:  “Women’s Health and Wellness”

10 a.m. — “Walking in Two Worlds: Incorporating Traditional Native American Practices into Personal and Professional Development,” Julie Smith, MS, LPCC, NCC (Lecture Bowl)

Noon — Panel discussion, “Sohkastwaw” [He/She Has Resilience], Und Society of Indian Psychologists student panelist (Lecture Bowl)

2 p.m. — “Empowering Ourselves to Inspire Others: The Gift of Our Strength,” Arla Duran-Velasquez, founder of Woman Warrior: Female Empowerment Through Fitness (Lecture Bowl)

4 p.m. — “Suicide: Culture and Resilience,” Gail Mason (Lecture Bowl)

6 p.m. — AISES Family Science Night: science-related activities for the youth, and GeoDome with Ojibwe/Lakota star knowledge presenter James Knutson-Kolodzne (Ballroom)

Thursday, April 20:  “Language and Culture Resilience”

1:30 p.m. — Performance by Wayne Fox, traditional Arikara hoop dancer (Ballroom)

3 p.m. — “Opening the Cultural Toolbox: Language Revitalization, Decolonization, and Healing,” Anton Treuer, professor, Bemidji State University (Ballroom)

4:15 p.m. — “Native Hip-Hop: Infusing Cultures,” Thomas Barrett (AKA Thomas X. Ojibwe, hip-hop artist) (Ballroom)

7 p.m. — Comedy hypnosis show, “You Will Be Amazed,” Scott Ward (Ballroom)

The Wacipi is set for Friday through Sunday, April 21-23, in the Hyslop Sports Center. Grand Entries will be at 7 p.m. Friday, 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, and 1 p.m. Sunday. A traditional meal open to Wacipi attendees and participants is set for 5 p.m. Saturday.

Admission to the Wacipi is $8 per day or $14 for the weekend; admission is free to children 5 and under, seniors 60 and older, and UND students (must show current student ID). Wristbands must be worn at all times.

— Richard Larson, UND Today staff writer