Computer science makes its move

UND Department returns to traditional home in the College of Engineering and Mines 

The UND Department of Computer Science made the move back to its original academic home, the College of Engineering and Mines, on July 1. Despite the move, the department will remain in its current space, using classrooms and labs as currently assigned, however, all administrative aspects of running the department were transferred to tje College of Engineering on July 1.

The UND Department of Computer Science made the move back to its original academic home, the College of Engineering and Mines, on July 1. For now, the department will remain in its current space at UND Aerospace, using classrooms and labs as currently assigned. All administrative aspects of running the department have been transferred to the College of Engineering & Mines.

Computer science is coming home.

The Department of Computer Science returned to its original academic home, the College of Engineering and Mines, on July 1.

The department will remain in its current space, using classrooms and labs as currently assigned. All administrative aspects of running the department will be transferred to engineering on July 1. There will be no disruption of teaching or research activities that are currently planned.

Faculty in both Computer Science and Engineering are excited about the move, said Hesham El-Rewini. dean of the College of Engineering and Mines.

“I expect the computer science faculty to strengthen their existing partnerships with the Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences as they explore opportunities for greater collaboration with their new colleagues in engineering. There is a great synergy between computer science and engineering which will result in numerous new opportunities in both research and academic programs, easier collaboration, and fewer administrative barriers,” El-Rewini said.

Most computer science programs in the United States are housed within colleges of engineering, and this move will make UND’s program more on par with other programs across the nation, and computer science graduates more competitive in the job market.

College of Engineering & Mines leaders say there will be no disruption of teaching or research activities that are currently planned, as a result of the move.

College of Engineering & Mines leaders say there will be no disruption of teaching or research activities that are currently planned, as a result of the move.

A seamless transition

“Students will experience no interruption with their classes, and they will receive services and support through the Solberg Family Student Success Center,” El-Rewini said. Engineering’s IT service team will work closely with the UND Aerospace technology support team to continue collaboration and to support student laboratories. “Students will only be positively impacted.”

“Having Computer Science and Electrical Engineering in one college will help us cover the entire continuum of subjects in data, hardware and software,” said El-Rewini. “It will make it easier to collaborate in the areas of cyber security and big data.” He added that earning double-majors and minors will be easier and faster.

There are other advantages to the move, El-Rewini said. Computer science students will be able to work more closely with engineering students on projects that will better prepare them for employment and internships.

The College also offers a mentorship program, and peer and industry mentors will be assigned to computer science students. The Solberg Center will also help detect and solve problems students may have before they affect their grades or graduation.

Positive impact

“Computer science is an area of growth nationwide, and we plan to work together to help grow enrollment at UND,” said El-Rewini, who added that prospective students usually look for the department under engineering. And as the department grows, he hopes to hire more faculty. “Growth cannot come without resources.”

El-Rewini has met with faculty and staff to ensure a smooth transition, and invited several members of the computer science department to his annual leadership retreat.

“We had great conversations about the future of the college and the department,” El-Rewini said. “Computer science will play an integral role in the future of the College of Engineering and Mines. The synergy allows us to do great work in cybersecurity, big data, and UAS.”

El-Rewini said he will be contacting the more than 1,300 living computer science alumni to inform them of the change and the opportunities that come with it. He will also add people from the computer industry to engineering’s Executive Board of corporate and community leaders.

“This will open many doors for computer science,” said El-Rewini. “It will highlight their great work and attract more students to the program. The opportunities are limitless.”