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Student Research Spotlight: Toluwase Omojiba

Toluwase Omojiba, a second-year graduate student at the University of North Dakota, has embarked on the transformative journey to explore the viability of hybrid wind-solar systems for residential applications in North Dakota.


A vision into the potential of hybrid wind-solar systems in North Dakota

Toluwase Omojiba, a second-year graduate student at the University of North Dakota, has embarked on the transformative journey to explore the viability of hybrid wind-solar systems for residential applications in North Dakota. Toluwase is currently pursuing a Master’s in Energy Systems Engineering at the University of North Dakota.

Recognizing the unique position that North Dakota serves as a sparsely populated state while simultaneously being the second-largest residential energy consumer, the call to develop innovative and sustainable energy sources encouraged Toluwase to envision further.

Toluwase Omojiba, 2024.

Crafting the Vision

Hybrid wind-solar systems offer a promising solution with their significance in the evolving technological advancements in renewable energy. Toluwase’s project, “Exploring the Potential of Hybrid Wind-Solar Systems for Residential Applications in North Dakota,” aims to provide sustainable and economically viable solutions for North Dakota’s residential sector and environmentally friendly energy solutions.

Approaching His Vision

Under the mentorship and guidance of his advisor, Toluwase developed a strategic plan for the project. This plan began with an extensive literature review that explored the scope and potential of hybrid renewable energy systems, ultimately laying the foundation for his exploration.

Through advanced modelling tools such as MATLAB and Holmer, he was able to conduct an in-depth analysis of the state’s wind and solar resources, contributing to the design and simulation of a hypothetical hybrid system.

“The project employs a combination of quantitative analysis and simulation to model the performance of the hybrid wind-solar system”, says Toluwase. His thorough approach targets the technical feasibility, economic viability, and environmental impacts of introducing hybrid systems into residential environments.

Once finished, the final report will be accessible to the public via the UND scholarly commons.

Discoveries and Challenges

While the project is still ongoing, the preliminary findings are a precursor to the promising outcomes for the future of North Dakota’s residential energy sector. Consistent energy output, cost savings, and substantial reductions in carbon emissions paint a compelling picture of the potential of hybrid systems for residential energy needs.

Toluwase encountered challenges along the way, including accessing comprehensive datasets. By collaborating with his colleagues to obtain the required data and resources and by gaining a well-rounded educational experience throughout his time in the energy engineering program at the University, Toluwase succeeded. He was able to successfully lay out a robust foundation for his future endeavours in the energy sector, reinforcing his commitment to contributing towards a more sustainable and energy-efficient future.


Written by John Nguyen  //  UND College of Engineering & Mines